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Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)
already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
are in pretty bad trouble. >> reporter: last year, during tropical storm irene, the waters came within less than a foot from topping the flood walls. and now, sandy's storm surge is predicted to be even stronger. since irene failed to do the damage here in new york city that many predicted, some people, like this family, who live in the evacuation zone, are refusing to heed the warnings for sandy. >> we have diapers, we have water. you know, just hoping to make the best of it. >> reporter: there are long lines as the supermarket tonight. >> it really is a mad house. >> reporter: yeah. >> like, oh, my god. >> reporter: the streets are crackling not with panic but with with an upbeat, pre-apocalyptic vibe. >> i'm a new yorker. come on, what do you want to do? >> reporter: got to admire her spirit. one piece of breaking news from here in new york. we just learned that the stock market will be closed tomorrow. there were concerns if they tried to stay open, they might lose power during the course of the day. back to you. >> and a few people over your shoulder still getting into the subway. dan harri
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
to clear but also to get, for example, the power companies back in. >> reporter: during hurricane irene last year, about 6 million homes lost electricity. this researcher plugged in all the information into a new program, and he believes this will be worse. >> our estimate at this point is 10 million. it could be higher. it could be lower. >> reporter: 10 million or more without power for a week to ten days, which is why this wisconsin company has added extra shifts, trying to build as many portable generators as quickly as possible. officials worry that residents might misuse some of those generators, putting them indoors, or stringing extension cords dangerously. many seem to be heeding the warnings, checking off their lists of preparedness, batteries, water, nonperishable food. >> i'm nervous about losing power. i'm nervous about the storm. >> reporter: some of the best advice from officials, if a tree takes down one of your power lines, leave the power line alone. leave the tree limb alone as well. let the power company take care of it. david kerley, abc news, rehoboth beach, delawa
. >> damages are likely to surpass those of last year's hurricane irene. sandy has move left much flooding in its wake, paralyzing new york's mass transit system and leaving millions in the dark -- sandy has left much flooding in its wake. >> here is more from america's most populous city. >> the storm has moved on, but the water remains. many of the city's road and subway tunnels are still flooded. public transport will be out of action for days to come. the effects of sandy can be seen on the streets -- residents are relieved that the worst is now behind them. >> well, last night, we could look down this street here, and we saw the river coming toward us. it actually look like something out of a movie. it was unbelievable. >> near central park, a crane dangles from a construction site over the street below. the storm caused it to partially collapsed. there are still strong winds, but nothing like those of monday night, which saw gusts of up to 130 kilometers per hour. there were record levels of flood water. emergency services are working around the clock. firefighters were called to a l
to this storm after hurricane erin green. -- hurricane irene. this is an island. it is very vulnerable to flooding. that has been known for some time. need some sort of coastal defenses. >> thank you very much. for the last 24 hours, images have been coming in of the sheer strength left by sandy. here are a few photographs that capture these images. ♪ ♪ >> the extraordinary images of new york city, a city that all of us know so well, but it looks very different today. that brings the program to a close. i'm kathy kaye. thank you for watching. i will see you tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding for this presentation was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for
will happen. gerri: where would it ranked? if it was a billion. >> i can tell you that hurricane irene last year was $43 billion in damage, and that was the top ten costliest hurricane. gerri: we are not done with hurricane season. >> we have a lot of time left to go. hurrican are august, but basically it runs until the end of november. so we could even have another storm after this. gerri: what is the one thing you tell people to do this weekend? >> everybody should basically do a home inventory. you have time, your home, a detailed list of your stuff. we have a free application and suffer to make it easy. this way if you have to file a claim you know what you have. it will also help you to buy the right amount of insurance "and a lot of good tips for making sure you have the right amount of coverage. gerri: bring in your pink flamingos people. you cannot have them outside. they become missiles. >> that is another good thing. take in everything from outside. gerri: all right. thank you for coming on. appreciate your time and tips. coming at, apple's stock dropped 00 in the past month. is t
of that was west of the coast, at least where i was we didn't get the rain we got with irene, not even close. >> right, we were most concerned about the flooding because of the tidal action. right there, yeah, the surge, we have wonderful beaches and between dewey beach and bethany beach we had to close route 1. there are a lot of others we had to close throughout the state. the bay communities were hit hard but we've got people out looking right now. we think we escaped the worst of it. >> and total cost for delaware, any idea yet in. >> we don't know. we have people as we say looking right now, i think it will take us a little while to figure that out. certainly concerned about the 44,000 families without power but we're obviously looking forward to utility crews getting out there as soon as, once conditions permit them to be out there. they can't be in harm's way if the winds are too high. >> for your state was this not as significant or not as negative of an outcome as irene, governor? >> well, i mean i'd put it this way we have a lot of flooding and we do have 40,000 plus people without
with the cold air. however, irene... dissipated in strength but not this one. but the purple, blue, the pink are all flood wind and snow warnings. there is a lot going on and as i mentioned it is going to be rather stagnant. we are going to see out regis ringbolt accumulations not to mention the storm surge is coming in from the ocean without regis rainfall out reg--outrageous we will see some rain but nothing compared to the east coast. that is not going to be impacting us until the end of the week by thursday. dense fog, overnight over the golden gate. with reduced visibility. sunny, mild and the more cloud coverage and cooler temperatures. the chance of rain, later for tonight. taking a look at the dense fog advisory. visibility will be sharply reduced in the areas that we see white. and keep that in mind for your morning commute. the 70's with 72 in santa rosa, '60s and '70s to pleasanton. 73 and san jose. it is not expected to push through until i said until wednesday morning. the clouds will repressing in for the giants. drizzle and we can see that it is well offshore. by 8:00 p.m. it
of impacted households as hurricane irene. hurricane high ren was irene .2. 1.2 are pse&g. 935,000 from jcp & l. 195,000 from atlantic city electric. and 45,000 from orange and rockland. during hurricane irene restoration took eight days for full restoration. for hurricane sandy full restoration may, in fact, take longer. full damage assessment will not be complete until 24 to 48 hours due to some of the weather delays. they cannot develop a time frame for restoration until damage estimates are under way and obviously these difficult weather conditions are making this more of a challenge. however, the utility companies have continued to reach out to other states for assistance and we're expecting additional linemen and service men from states as far away from texas and indiana and even folks coming in to us from canada. it will remain dangerous in areas where trees and wires are down. ask people to use extreme caution. assume any wire you see down is a live wire and please do not go near it. there are currently 173 incidents statewide involving highways and lane closures. most of these clos
larger than anything we have experienced most recently, like irene. richard? >> erica, keep it safe out there. >>> today people living in the district can pick up sandbags to protect their homes from flooding. d.c.'s department of public works will hand out sandbags at the tacoma park center. d.c. residents can stop by from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. to pick up their sandbags. there is a five-bag limit per car. >>> throughout our area people are preparing for the worst, not only stocking up for the possibility of long power outages but in some neighborhoods they're bracing for flooding. news 4's jackie bensen reports. >> reporter: in the huntington section of fairfax county it's a tense game of watching and waiting. this flyer was hand delivered to every home in the area which has been devastated regularly by flooding, warning residents to be prepared. as recently as august, residents of this neighborhood were pumping water out of their basements. >> we've been preparing for a couple days. >> reporter: at twins ace hardware store on main street in fairfax, you can tell what people need by
? >> in terms of intensity? i immediately think of last year's hurricane irene that treated delaware more lightly than it treated our surrounding states. >> any advice for residents there this evening? and what can they expect when the sun comes up later this morning? >> the best advice we are giving now is for people to -- who say well things look good out there, and jm going to go out to the store or go out and do my normal life. take a day. we have flooded roads. we have trees that are down and branches that are down on roadways. we have power lines that are down. so conditions -- there are some dangerous conditions out there across the state. if people go out too early, we could have some issues. we don't want to have that because we have come through pretty good so far. people just need to take a day, stay home, let the highway crews go out and clear the roads. let the electrical crews go out and put the lines back up and deal with those situations and not have to go out and try to rescue people who get themselves in trouble because they just went out too soon. >> gary lange joining
was set back during hurricane irene. i was driving down here this morning, the entire lower part of manhattan blacked out. con edison says 250,000 homes inside new york city itself without power. the subways as you've been saying, shut down completely. six of the tubes, six of the tunnels from manhattan to queens and brooklyn flooded. they do not know when they'll get them pumped out over the next four days, they hope. again that flooding really did wreak some havoc here, soledad. >> yes, it has. we're going to have a chance later this morning. as the sun's coming up we can see the damage, john. this side there are lots of submerged cars. i'm looking at someone's tire standing in the middle of the street. that can't be good. we'll update folks on the damage on this side of manhattan. let's go to ali velshi. ali was in atlantic city yesterday and they're watching what's happening with him, where he was just being battered by the high winds, and the surf, as well. ali, i'm glad to see you in one piece, frankly. how's it going where you are? >> still a lot of wind as you can see. st
in white plains, where literally trees are ripped from its roots. >> amazing stuff. first, irene, now sandy. for two consecutive years, costly deadly hurricanes hit the northeast. we're hear a lot of people say if irene was a wake-up call, sandy is a bucket of water that should snap us all to attention. let's listen to andrew cuomo, the governor of new york. >> there has been a series of extreme weather incidents. anyone that is not a political statement, that is not a factual statement. anyone who says there is not a dramatic change in weather patterns, i think is denying reality. and i would like to say that this is probably the last occurrence we will have. i don't believe that. >> cuomo went on to say new york now seems to get a 100 year flood every two years. joining me now is ben strauss, the chief operating officer and director of the program on sea level rise at climate central. is this a sign of things to come? governor cuomo is saying we seem to be getting 100-year storm every two years. >> this was actually -- since 1900, three of the top ten highest flood levels have occurred in
of practice with stuff like this, whether it's irene a week ago, isaac, months ago and we're mobilizing blood, making sure the blood supply needs to be in the key areas of the country. >> rick: the last minute preparations, there isn't a lot of time left. any last minute thing you can suggest to people that they do? >> the most important thing right now in the last minute if there's little time to get out and make sure you've got the food and water you need in terms of your kit, is to have a battery operated radio, something that can give you the ability to listen to any evacuation orders or any emergency notices that may be going out. >> rick: all right, charles one last thing-- >> mention that the red cross has-- >> that's exactly where i was going to lead you i saw the phone in your hand and talk about an app? >> i am going to talk about a hurricane app. the red cross has a hurricane app that's available for apple and android, folks can download it, it's got a tremendous "i'm safe" feature that allows people with a one push of a button let friends and family know they're safe and an import
. the east coast of the u.s. and variety of events in the past, last year irene resell the surge on the kinetic coast and elsewhere. -- irene last year and elsewhere. >> time for one last question. >> your line is open. >> this storm already is proving to be a major flood event. i was hoping you could speak to what you will be doing in terms of immediate air emergency response and then speak to the coast guard about people having to evacuate people and what you're doing to help communities that have been flooded in the coming weeks. take a safety first. not only are we dealing with coastal flooding, but inland flooding. -- >> safety first. first thing is search and rescue. the assistance will be based upon the needs. the first question is, are they going to need housing assistance? we have already looked at the availability of housing stock, rental properties if we have the housing commission. we are anticipating what the needs are, though we will not know exactly until we see the impact. we are preparing with flight safety, immediate needs, housing, and then moving to recovery.
, would be more dangerous than even irene from last year. it turned out to be a huge flood problem for virginia, vermont and new jersey. i know it's late in the season, but the water is still warm enough to make this storm generate. it went -- i was watch it last night in bed on my -- i was tweeting from 8:00 until 12:00, and this thing went from an 80-mile-per-hour storm to about a 115 as it left jamaica and slammed into cuba, and that was only in five hours. there's a lot of potential. >> is it true that a late storm as well could be a lot deadlier, a lot more dangerous late in the season? >> i would say an earlier storm, october 10th, that peak day with the waters the warmest would be the most concerning, but i think people probably take it less serious. oh, come on, it's november. it can't happen. there's not going to be anything bad. if you let your guard down and think that it's out of season, you're wrong. look at the waves there. is that miami? somewhere. look at that. the way it's crashing on. that's why you can't even be on the sea wall. you need to be behind it and in th
. just like tropical storm irene did last year. the difference is, this is drawing in a lot of cold air from canada. it could produce up to a foot of snow in parts of west virginia, ohio, and pennsylvania. so we're talking about not only a tropical system with tons of rain and flooding and massive power outages but snow as well. the effects of this could be felt for weeks. >> okay, al roker, many thanks for that. >>> our colleagues at the weather channel are following this storm closely as well. we're going have a live report from meteorologist julie martin coming your way at the top of the hour. >>> from there to politics now, ten days to go until the election. today in his weekly address president obama's emphasizing the progress made four years after the wall street crisis. >> our businesses have added more than 5 million new jobs. the unemployment rate has fallen to the lowest level since i took office. home values are ride rising again and our assembly lines are humming once more. >> mitt romney and paul ryan are looking to gain momentum holding a rally last night in canton. >> i w
are open as of now. expectations are almost 12 foot storm surge. irene at 9 in comparison just to give you an idea of what we're looking at here. we're also starting to see some twitter pictures come in of the main fishing pier in ocean city, maryland being washed away. pictures of atlantic city underwater. it is a little tricky for us to put emphasis on campaign developments knowing what's to come weatherwise and that obviously is of the utmost concern especially in people safety but we do only have eight days left. that means weighing the impact on everything from early voting of course now to access and power to the polling places on election day itself. it is harder to get out the vote door knocking when people can't get out and about. the millions of dollars that conservatives have saved up to bombard the airways in the homestretch may be waste if the no one can watch tv. and even the news itself is going to be all storm all the time at least until the worst seemed to have past. it will change the nature of th
Search Results 0 to 41 of about 42 (some duplicates have been removed)